The use of  e-readers such as the kindle, nook or kobo readers is on a steady incline and whilst whether we should be reading traditional books or e-books has been long debated, there have always been pros and cons for both sides. I hope that this post will give a clearer view of those pros and cons.

When people first start considering buying an e-reader, the first thing that usually comes to mind is that it is a lot more compact than carrying around a pile of books. You can have an almost endless supply of books at your fingertips. There are thousands of books available in an instant, to anyone owning an e-reader with access to Wi-Fi, you’re almost spoilt for choice.

You’ll end up spending significantly less money in the long run. After spending the initial amount on the device itself, you’ll find that you’re spending less annually on books. on average, a book from a bookshop like Waterstones will usually cost you between £8 – £12 per book, whereas if you bought an e-book, it’ll be closer to £4/ £5 mark for a brand new book (and that’s not including the kindle daily/ weekly/ monthly deals where e-books will very often be reduced to 99p or £1.99). It is definitely a lot more cost effective when you look at it like that.

However, it can be argued that even though e-books may seem to be the more convenient option, you can never out do the smell of a book or that distressed look that a book gets after it’s been read over and over (that worn look that shows how much the reader enjoyed the book).

A digital book vs. a real book…I'm not totally anti-digital books, but nothing will ever replace the real thing.:

As much as this topic has been debated since the beginning of the e-reader, one thing that I’m sure all book lovers alike can agree on is that doesn’t matter whether it’s a paperback, a hardback or an e-book as long as you’re reading. Don’t let the art of literature die!

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